Putting The Ice In Iceland

September 10, 2012

Apologies for the lack of pictures, i have a connection thats flakier than a freshly baked croissant…

Waking up in Akureyri for he third morning in a row, we were eager to get out of the hostel and into the winter wilderness that awaited us, due to the previous days snowstorm.

Our first two nights we had had the room to ourselves, but last night we were joined by two characters who had escaped from the circus; literally. Both working for Cirque De Soleil, one a rigger, one an Automator, had an awesome little helicopter rig, to which they had attached two GoPro cameras. I met this thing after it had taken an unfortunate dip into a hot spring. Interesting stuff.

Having been held up by the snow, we had to start heading south via route 1, of which parts were still deemed impassible at 11am after the roads authority closed it due to dangerous conditions (snow on road, blizzard, ice on road, totally impassable…)

It was mesmerizing sight, large mountains, a river running between it, and everything coated in snow. The river was frozen around the edges, the grass, weighed down by inches of pure white Icelandic frozen water. Chunks of ice floated downstream like a rowing team, and as the clouds parted, we began to see blue sky, something which seemed impossible just hours earlier.

We made it to Goddafoss, a semi-circled waterfall. Beautiful light bounced off the hills behind, the falls were spectacular in their appearance and as always, vantage points were snapped up by amateur and professional photographers alike. Moving onto a roadhouse to go to the WC, we bought a dorky tourist tshirt and drove onwards to Lake Myvatn, again in hills coated with heavy snowfalls from the day before.

It was seriously surreal, I really did not expect such heavy falls to occur, even though it is supposed to be autumn. The locals say that it has rarely gotten this heavy, and that it’s also unseasonably early for these kinds of falls.

Eventually, and after multiple stops because the scenery was so good, we reached the lake. What was merely an hour or two’s drive from Akureyri took us a staggering 5 hours. But that’s part of the deal of the trip, it’s the unexpected stops that you make, that add up to a lot of time.

By late afternoon, we figured that we were not going to make it to our intended destination on the east coast, and that the ambient temperature overnight would drop too low for us to sleep in the car. We found accommodation, made plans for dinner and continued on our scouting journey. We found the hot springs that the public visit, and unfortunately lots and lots of elderly tourists…

We shot some more and then returned to our accommodation, who, also make pizza. It was really good, not greasy, full of flavour too. Worth every cent we paid for it. Now, heres hoping my boots dry overnight, weve lost electricity here again, workers are trying to repair the lines that were taken down by yesterdays snow storm here. As we saw on our drive over, pole after pole was thrown like a twig into the rough snow below, the force of the wind just too much for some of the older poles, and some just bore too much brunt and gave in to the arctic gusts under the weight of the accumulated ice.

Quite a sight to see!


Archive
January February March April May June July August September (14) October (3) November (1) December (1)
January February March April (1) May (1) June July (1) August September October November (1) December (6)
January February (1) March April May June July August (1) September (1) October November (1) December
January February March April May June July August September October November December (1)
January February March (2) April (1) May June July August September October (1) November December (1)
January February March April May June July August September October November December